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Sample of resignation letter with notice

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Sample of resignation letter with notice
January 21, 2019 Anniversary Wishes 3 comments

Oct 11, 2018 A gracious resignation letter protects your relationship with colleagues as you Learn how to write a professional resignation letter, see a few samples, and notice to your superior might not suffice as an official resignation.

  • Creating and submitting a professional resignation letter can have a lasting effect on how you are viewed by past and future colleagues and employers.
  • Your resignation letter should be short and concise. Include the date of your last working day, your offer to assist with the transition and your gratitude for the opportunity with your soon-to-be former employer.
  • In your resignation letter, do not air your grievances or speak poorly about the company or co-workers. 

Resigning from a job, regardless of the pretenses, is a major life decision and should be taken seriously. Crafting and submitting a professional resignation letter is a key aspect of the resignation process and can leave a lasting impression on former and future employers. 

Pat Roque, career transformation coach at Rock on Success, described a job resignation letter as being a formal notification of your exit strategy. 

"It is a required document that becomes part of your employee records," Roque told Business News Daily. "Think of it as the last chapter of your story at your former company." 

Your letter should have a neutral tone that informs your employer that you are leaving and on what date, plus it should offer to assist in the transition to someone new and thank them for the time you were part of the team. Despite your feelings about your job or your boss, being professional, courteous, and helpful provides closure and a positive path forward. 

"Always keep the door open, because you never know when you may want to return or even work with other colleagues in a future role elsewhere," said Roque.

James Rice, head of digital marketing at WikiJob, said that although you will likely be expected to hand in a standard resignation letter, it is usually best to schedule a meeting with your boss to personally give them the letter and discuss your resignation in person. 

What your resignation letter should say

Although the specific contents of your job resignation letter can be tailored to your job and company, there are a few basic elements that should always be included. Regardless of the circumstances, keep it simple and concise. 

Roque suggested including the following elements: 

  • Your end date. Provide your official end date, ideally at least two weeks in advance.
  • Help with the transition. Express your commitment to ensuring a smooth and easy transition, including availability to discuss your workload and status updates with your manager or successor.
  • Gratitude for the opportunity. Find something nice to say, regardless of any differences you may have with a bossy colleague or how toxic the job may have become.
  • Request for instructions (optional). If you aren't yet aware of the exit protocol at your company, request specific instructions about final work commitments and such. Some companies will ask you to leave immediately, while others will have you very involved in a transition over the two-week period, or they may ask you to work from home and see HR to return your laptop on your last official day. 

Alex Twersky, co-founder of Resume Deli, added that offering to assist in training a replacement, preparing the team for your departure and expressing gratitude are important elements of a job resignation letter. 

"Conjure up ... the best time at your job and have that image top of mind when you write your resignation letter," said Twersky. "Let your boss think they were great, even if they weren't. [You might] get a good recommendation out of it."

What your resignation letter shouldn't say

Just as important as knowing what to say in a resignation letter, is knowing what not to say. Many resigning employees make the mistake of including too many personal details and emotional statements in their official letters. 

When you are writing an official resignation letter, omit the following details: 

  • Why you are leaving. Although you may feel the need to explain away your reason for leaving, this is not necessary to include in your resignation Rice said you may believe that the new employer has a better product, service, working environment, salary or benefits package, but these are not things to state in your resignation letter. Keep your language professional and positive.
  • What you hated about the job. A resignation letter is not the place to air your grievances or speak poorly of your soon-to-be former company or co-workers. Roque said to let go of anger before submitting the letter. She also suggested having someone else review your letter before submission to ensure it is appropriately polite and succinct.
  • Emotional statements. Twersky stressed the importance of keeping a calm, professional tone in your letter. An aggressive or otherwise emotional letter will only come back to hurt you. Twersky said that, even if you are overworked and resentful, don't quit angry. Avoid using phrases like "I feel" or "I think," unless they are followed up by positive statements. 

When writing your letter, try not to burn your bridges as you may need them in the future. 

"Your employers may be providing you with a reference, or if you are staying in the same field, you may still network in the same circles or want to return in the future," said Rice. "It is always good to keep in touch with your old colleagues and with social networks like LinkedIn, it may be hard to avoid them." 

These are also good tips to keep in mind when you have the conversation informing your supervisor or manager that you are leaving. Short and simple is fine; there is no reason to explain your reasons if you don't want to. Just stay polite, respectful and professional throughout the discussion.

Sample resignation letter

Based on advice from our experts, here is an all-purpose resignation letter template you can fill in with your personal details. Remember, you are not required to include your reason for resigning in your letter. 

[Current date]

Dear [supervisor's name],

Please accept this letter as my formal resignation from my role as [title]. My last day with [company] will be [end date].

To ease the transition after my departure, I am happy to assist you with any training tasks during my final weeks on the job. I intend to leave thorough instructions and up-to-date records for my replacement.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for the knowledge and experience I have gained by working here. I am very grateful for the time I have spent on our team and the professional relationships I've built. It's been a pleasure working for you, and I hope our paths will cross again in the future.

Sincerely,

[Your signature and printed name]

If you opt to provide a reason for leaving, either in your letter or during the conversation with your employer, be clear and positive, focusing on what you are gaining from the change and not the circumstances that caused it. Always maintain your professionalism and keep things formal. 

"Remember that people leave their jobs every day, and your manager will be used to the process," said Rice. "If you are courteous and thoughtful when resigning from your job, you will make the process easier for everyone and set yourself on the right path for future success." 

Additional reporting by Nicole Fallon and Marci Martin. Some source interviews were conducted for a previous version of this article.

If you have decided to resign from your job, it is customary to provide your employer with two weeks notice. Whatever your reason for leaving, two weeks gives an employer enough time to come up with plans to cover your absence. Read below for tips on how to write a resignation.

How to Give Two Weeks Notice (with Examples)

sample of resignation letter with notice

If you’re moving on to a new opportunity or a new job, congratulations! We’ve got the resignation letter template you need here.

We’ll also go into instructions on how to write a resignation letter, what to include, what to avoid, and how to submit it.

Leaving your current employer on good terms is important. 

It can help with getting a good reference further down the line, not to mention affecting your professional reputation.

That’s why we have created this free resignation letter template for you to download.

Read on for all the steps you need to resign professionally, including how to write the perfect resignation letter.

You’ll also see a range of sample resignation letters for different situations. These apply whether you’re resigning from a professional job, a retail job, or a casual job, with notice or without.

How to Write a Resignation Letter

  1. Confirm the date that you are resigning.
  2. Name the date of your last day of work, according to your employment contract.
  3. Show appreciation for your time working there.
  4. State your reasons for leaving (if appropriate).
  5. Thank your employer.
  6. Provide contact information for the transition period, and offer support.

When writing a resignation letter, you should also consider your employment contract, as they can be quite different across companies. 

Check Your Employment Contract

  1. Check your company’s termination policy. Refer to the terms of your contract for the minimum notice period. The standard is two weeks notice, but this may vary between companies. 
  2. Check other contractual terms. These include non-competition, non-solicitation and non-poaching clauses. Particularly if you’re communicating to your employer where your new opportunity will be.

How to Resign Professionally

  1. Tell your manager face to face: First, sit down with your manager for a face-to-face chat. Declare your intention to resign in a direct, positive way, for example, “I have enjoyed working here, and I’ve learned a lot, but now it’s time for me to move on.”
  2. Write a resignation letter: Submit your formal resignation in writing. Keep the resignation letter simple, brief, positive, and to the point.
  3. Offer support with training your replacement. If appropriate, offer to help find a new candidate. 
  4. Give proper notice to resign: Where possible, try to give your employer as much notice as you can to allow time for adequate handover and recruitment. Two weeks is standard, but it’s good form to offer more when you can.

What to Write in a Resignation Letter

Your letter of resignation should include, at minimum:

  1. The date, company name, and manager’s name.
  2. State that you are resigning, what job title you are resigning from, and the date of submitting your resignation.
  3. Refer to your current employment contract. Advise the intended date of your last day of work, based on the terms of your employment.
  4. Show your appreciation of the time you have had at the company. Describe what you will be taking away from your experience.
  5. Provide contact information so they can contact you to make final arrangements.
  6. Depending on the reason for leaving, provide reasons. Some examples of reasons include career advancement, relocation, or to seek further education.

What to Avoid in the Resignation Letter

  1. Never criticise your employer. The appropriate forum to offer this type of feedback is during a formal exit interview;
  2. Do not single out any managers, co-workers or subordinates; and
  3. Avoid emotive, inappropriate and/or offensive language.

Professional resignation letter samples to use in Australia

There are various reasons for people to leave their jobs, and the resignation letter needs to effectively reflect the reason. The below resignation letter examples have been provided to sample different approaches to resigning, including career change, career advancement, relocation, education, retirement, without notice period, and generic (non-specific).

Career Change Resignation Letter Example

In the case of resignation due to a career change, it is appropriate to explain your reasons in the resignation letter. Take the time to speak with your manager about the career move. The letter of resignation example below shows how to explain your motivations:

Mr Brown
Managing Director
Company Services Pty Ltd
1 Company Street
Sydney NSW 2000
18th September 2019

Dear [Manager’s Name],

I am writing this letter to inform you that I am resigning from my position as Operations Manager at [Company Name] Pty Ltd.

As per my contract of employment, I am giving you one month’s notice, and my final day of employment with the company will be on the 16th October 2019.

I am leaving to pursue a career as a personal trainer as this has always been an ambition of mine.

I will ensure that all my work is completed and/or in a position to be handed over to ensure a smooth transition period. Please also note that I am prepared to assist with recruiting for and training my replacement prior to my leaving.

I would like to take this time to thank you for the opportunity to work for [Company Name] and wish you and the company all the best.

Should you require anything further, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Yours sincerely,

John Smith
2 Home Road
Sydney NSW 2000

Career Advancement Resignation Letter Example

Career advancement is one of the most common reasons for resigning from a position. Unfortunately, it may not always be realistic for career progression within the current place of employment, in which case this should be highlighted in the resignation letter. The below letter of resignation is an example of pursuing an external opportunity:

Mr Brown
Managing Director
Company Services Pty Ltd
1 Company Street
Sydney NSW 2000

18th September 2019

Dear [Manager’s Name],

I am writing to tender my resignation from my position of [Job Title] at [Company Name] Pty Ltd, with my last day of employment being 16th October 2020 in accordance with the notice period in my contract of employment.

I am ready to take the next step in my career and have accepted a position as Head of Operations.

I would like to take this time to thank you for the opportunity to work for [Company Name] and wish you and the company all the best.

Should you require anything further, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Yours sincerely,

John Smith
2 Home Road
Sydney NSW 2000

Relocation Resignation Letter Example

If you need to relocate, it is important to explain to your manager the reason for your resignation, both verbally and in writing. The below example demonstrates how this can be written, in addition to providing assistance for a smooth transition:

Mr Brown
Managing Director
Company Services Pty Ltd
1 Company Street
Sydney NSW 2000

18th September 2019

Dear [Manager’s Name],

It is with regret that I am writing to you to offer my resignation from my position as [Job Title] at [Company Name] Pty Ltd, with my last day of employment being 16th October 2019 in accordance with the notice period in my contract of employment.

I am relocating to Melbourne with my family, and in the absence of an internal transfer, I will be seeking employment in a similar role when we arrive. It would be greatly appreciated if you would provide me with a written reference to assist me with my transition.

Please also note that I am prepared to assist with recruiting for and training my replacement prior to my leaving, and will ensure that all my work is completed and/or in a position to be handed over to ensure a smooth transition period.

I would like to take this time to thank you for the opportunity to work for Company Services and wish you and the company all the best.

Should you require anything further, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Yours sincerely,

John Smith
2 Home Road
Sydney NSW 2000

 

Further Education Resignation Letter Example

When looking to further develop skill-sets and knowledge, or to delve into something entirely new, employees may choose to resign from their position to focus on study. In this situation, it is important to explain to your manager the reason for your resignation, both verbally and in writing. The letter of resignation example below shows how this can be communicated:

Mr Brown
Managing Director
Company Services Pty Ltd
1 Company Street
Sydney NSW 2000

18th September 2019

Dear [Manager Name],

Please accept this letter as formal notification that I will be resigning from my position of [Job Title] at [Company Name] Pty Ltd to pursue full-time studies at university.

In accordance with my employment contract, I am giving one month’s notice and my last day of employment will be 16th October 2019.

I would like to take this time to thank you for the opportunity to work for [Company Name], and wish you and the company all the best.

Should you require anything further, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Yours sincerely,

John Smith
2 Home Road
Sydney NSW 2000

 

Retirement Resignation Letter Example

In most cases, your employer will be aware of your upcoming retirement and will commence the procedures. However, it is courteous to communicate your intentions with your manager and formalise these intentions with a ‘resignation due to retirement’ letter for distribution to line managers, directors and HR departments. The letter of resignation example below demonstrates how to structure the notice:

Mr Brown
Managing Director
Company Services Pty Ltd
1 Company Street
Sydney NSW 2000

18th September 2019

Dear [Manager Name],

Please accept this letter as formal notice of my retirement due on 16th October 2019. I will, therefore, be leaving my position of [Job Title] at [Company Name] Pty Ltd as of this date.

I am prepared to assist with recruiting for and training my replacement prior to my leaving and will ensure that all my work is completed and/or in a position to be handed over to ensure a smooth transition period.

I would like to take this time to thank you for the opportunity to work for [Company Name] and wish you and the company all the best.

Please advise me of any next steps or requirements to finalise my arrangements.

Yours sincerely,

John Smith
2 Home Road
Sydney NSW 2000

 

Template for Letter of Resignation with No Notice Period

Resigning without a notice period is not very common, but can be relevant in some situations. In circumstances where you are not able to, or do not wish to work your notice period, an explanation is required. The letter of resignation example below shows how this can be communicated:

Mr Brown
Managing Director
Company Services Pty Ltd
1 Company Street
Sydney NSW 2000

18th September 2019

Dear [Manager Name],

I am writing this letter to inform you that I am resigning from my position as [Job Title] at [Company Name] Pty Ltd.

I realise that my contract of employment requires me to work until 16th October 2019, however, I would be grateful to be released earlier due to [reason].

Please also note that I am prepared to assist with recruiting for and training my replacement prior to my leaving, and will ensure that all my work is completed and/or in a position to be handed over to ensure a smooth transition period.

I would like to take this time to thank you for the opportunity to work for [Company Name] and wish you and the company all the best.

Should you require anything further, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Yours sincerely,

John Smith
2 Home Road
Sydney NSW 2000

 

Generic Resignation Letter Example

If the reason for resigning is simply a need for a change, a generic resignation letter is suitable. If you’re wondering how to write a resignation letter for a casual job, this is probably the template you need. As seen in the letter of resignation example below, the generic format leaves out any specific reasons for the resignation, and features basic details including the last day of employment:

Mr Brown
Managing Director
Company Services Pty Ltd
1 Company Street
Sydney NSW 2000

18th September 2019

Dear [Manager Name]

I am writing to tender my resignation from my position of [Job Title] at [Company Name] Pty Ltd, with my last day of employment being 16th October 2019 in accordance with the notice period in my employment contract.

Please note that I am prepared to assist with recruiting for and training my replacement prior to my leaving, and will ensure that all my work is completed and/or in a position to be handed over to ensure a smooth transition period.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for the opportunity to work for [Company Name] and wish you and the company all the best.

Should you require anything further, please let me know.

Yours sincerely,

John Smith
2 Home Road
Sydney NSW 2000

 

Resigning is never an easy thing to do. When done correctly, however, it can leave a positive and lasting impression with your current employer. 

Think about the long-term effects of how you handle this change. This way, your letter of resignation won’t work against you in the future – in fact, it may work in your favour long term.

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Free Downloadable Resignation Letter Samples

sample of resignation letter with notice

How to Write a Resignation Letter

Sample Resignation LettersWriting a Resignation LetterBeing SavvyArticle SummaryQuestions & AnswersRelated ArticlesReferences

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One of the greatest secrets of success is knowing when to move on. With the right resignation letter, you will do so with satisfaction while leaving on good terms with your previous employer. Though you may think it would feel great to get a few things off your chest about how much you've come to hate the company you work for, it's in your best interest to be kind, polite, and helpful, so your professional future remains secure. If you want to know how to write a resignation with class, see Step 1 to get started.

Steps

Part 1

Writing a Resignation Letter

  1. 1

    Have a friendly but formal opening. This can be a tricky balance to maintain, but your goal should be to keep things amicable while maintaining your professionalism. Unless you really don't have a good or familiar relationship with your boss, you should begin your letter by saying "Dear" followed by your boss's first name. You can say something like, "Dear Lisa," before you announce your resignation. If you say, "Dear Ms. Smith," then your resignation may come off as too formal, especially if you do have a friendly or at least cordial relationship with your boss.[1]
    • Of course, if things happen to be more formal at your company and you normally call your boss "Mr. Jones," then you should stick to that in the letter — in that case, suddenly getting familiar would be strange.
    • If your letter is typed on paper instead of email, just write the date at the top lefthand side, with your boss's name and address written below it.
  2. 2

    Clearly state your intention to resign. It's important to state your intention to resign in clear terms so that your boss doesn't think you are open to an offer for a higher salary or other perks, or that you are open to a counteroffer though you've accepted a new position. You want to be crystal clear so you sound confident in your decision, or so you're not faced with the discomfort of your boss coming to you thinking there's a chance that you'll stay on, after all. Here are some ways you can clearly state your intention to resign:
    • "I hereby submit my resignation as [your position here.]"
    • "Please accept this letter as notice of my resignation from my position as [your position here]."
    • "It is with regret that I submit my letter of resignation as [your position here]."
  3. 3

    Give proper notice. It is simple courtesy to give your employer a reasonable amount of time to fill your position. If your job is complicated, your employer may need time for you to train your replacement. Give notice of no less than two weeks. It may be common courtesy to give more notice if your position in the company is more elevated. Many people recommend using your given vacation time as an accurate measurement of how many weeks' notice you should give; if you have three weeks vacation, for example, you should give three weeks' notice, if you want to be polite. You should state your last work day immediately after you've stated your intentions to resign — you can even do so in the same sentence. Here's how you can go about it:[2]
    • "I hereby submit my resignation as [your position here] effective on July 12, 2014."
    • "Please accept this letter as notice of my resignation from my position as [your position here]. My last day of employment will be July 12, 2014."
    • "It is with regret that I submit my letter of resignation as [your position here]. I intend to work until the end of the month, with my last day being July 31, 2014."
  4. 4

    State your reasons for leaving (optional). You don't have to be too thorough in this part, but it could be a nice gesture to state your reasons for resigning. If you're resigning because you're just really unhappy at the company, you don't have to go into detail about this. However, if you're resigning because of retirement, maternity leave, personal reasons, or, most commonly, because you've accepted an offer at a different company, then you can state this to give your boss a better sense of the situation. Here are some ways that you can state your reasons for leaving:[3]
    • "I was recently offered a new opportunity at a different company, and have decided to accept the offer."
    • "I received an offer to serve as [position here] of a company that suits my needs, and after careful consideration, I've realized that this opportunity is the right path for me."
    • "I would like to inform you that I will be retiring on April 3."
    • "After much thought and consideration, I have decided not to return after maternity leave."
    • "I have decided to resign for personal reasons."
  5. 5

    State that you're willing to help out during the transition.If you're in a position that would be difficult to fill, and if you really feel you owe it to the company, then you can make it clear that you're happy to help train someone else to do your job or to smoothly pass on your duties. Ideally, if you were planning to resign, you might have been doing some of this already, little by little, but in any case, if you care about the company and know that you have big shoes to fill, you can mention that you're willing to help during in the interim. Here's how you can state it:[4]
    • "I would be happy to help with the transition of my duties so that the company continues to function smoothly after my departure. I am available to help recruit as well as train my replacement."
  6. 6

    Thank your employer for the experience. Resist the temptation to leave a piece of your mind unless you want to be remembered as an ungrateful whiner. In fact, do the opposite: document positive memories of your job. Mention how this job has positively influenced your career and how it has or can help you secure an even better position. This will leave your boss feeling like you've had a positive experience at the company and it will minimize any potential animosity you may encounter. Unless you really feel like your boss does not deserve any kind words, do this as a common courtesy. Here's what you can say:[5]
    • "I can't thank you enough for all of the experience and confidence my position has given me."
    • "I want to give you my sincere thanks for all of the opportunities you have given me and for all of the knowledge I have gained at your company over the years."
    • "I'll always be grateful to you for going above and beyond to ensure my success at my position."
  7. 7

    Wrap up your letter on a kind note. The way you end your letter depends on what you stated earlier. If you said you'd be happy to help recruit and train a new person for your position, you can say something like, "You can reach me any time at [your phone number] or [your email address]." This will show your boss that you really are committed to the success of your company. Remember that you don't want to end on anything but a positive tone that leaves your boss feeling warm, or at least not furious.[6]
    • If you really do have a close relationship with your boss, you can go the extra mile to make this clear by ending by saying something like, "I'll never forget how much you've helped me over the years, and will always be grateful to you" or, "I never would have been able to secure this new position without all of your help and encouragement over the years."
  8. 8

    Have a nice closing. End your letter by saying "Warmly," "Kind Regards," "Wishing you the best," or something similar just before you write your name. You can also just use "Sincerely" if you want to be more formal about it, but you can also use this opportunity to use a closing that really shows how grateful you are for your experience at the company.

Part 2

Being Savvy

  1. 1

    Stay professional. Be respectful and courteous. Do not use emotional or controversial language in your letter. You are a professional, so quit like a professional. If you have quit because of the working conditions at your company, you can kindly say so, but there's absolutely no reason to go into all of the details of why you have left the company. You can write them down on a different piece of paper for yourself, if it will make you feel better.[7]
    • Just remember that this letter will go in your personnel file and will be available any time a future employer calls the company asking about you; you don't want a negative letter to have an adverse effect on your future.
  2. 2

    If you're turning in your resignation letter through email, stick to similar conventions. These rules can be followed whether you're turning in a traditional resignation letter or if you're resigning over email. The only difference is that your email won't require you to write the date or your boss's address on the top lefthand side, and that you can title the subject of the email "Resignation" along with your name, to give your boss an idea of what to expect.
    • Resignation over email is becoming more common than ever in today's tech savvy society, though you should have a sense of workplace etiquette when you decide the best path to take.
    • With the mass transition to email for a lot of work correspondence, it's become common for resignation letters to have become a bit shorter than they used to be. Now, just 5-6 sentences can do the tricks instead of several detailed paragraphs.
  3. 3

    Read it over before you turn it in. Though this piece of advice is true for any piece of professional correspondence, it's particularly important to give your resignation one last look before you turn it in. While checking for typos and grammatical mistakes is important, what's more important is that you're pleased with the overall impression given by the letter, and that it comes off as positive instead of hostile. You may just quickly get everything off your chest and want to turn it in immediately, but if you let it cool for an hour and read it over again, you may see that it could have been a bit more kind.
    • Once you turn in the letter, there's no taking back anything you said. Make sure that it's something you're proud of, not a way to get back at your boss.

Community Q&A

Add New Question
  • Question

    How do I write a resignation letter if I hate my boss?

    Just keep it classy and respectful, no matter how much you despise them. It will show your boss that you are a professional and mature person.

  • Question

    When sending a resignation in email format, should the letter be sent as an attachment or typed into the email?

    It would be a good idea to do both, so your boss can save it in whichever format they want to.

  • Question

    How would I write a resignation letter due to family problems, where my family needs me to be at home?

    You should refer to your reasons/problems as "personal reasons." You shouldn't share too much personal information with your boss, even if you are close to him or her. If your boss is truly concerned about you, he or she will ask you; even then, you are under no obligation to give your boss details about your personal life.

  • Question

    How do I thank my manager for the opportunity when I've been in my position longer than she's been in hers?

    Thank your manager by showing how much you valued working with her over x amount of years and that you enjoyed establishing a professional relationship. Although you have been there longer, thank your manager and say that it has been an honor providing great service and leadership and that she helped you provide more professional experience.

  • Question

    How do I write a resignation letter for resigning without notice due to issues within the company?

    You should be honest in your letter, but you do not have to write down everything you're thinking. You don't want to burn any bridges unnecessarily. At some point in the letter, briefly apologize for the lack of notice.

  • Question

    Who should I write address my resignation letter to? My supervisor, my manager, or the HR officer?

    It can be any one of these or all three. As long as you've made your intentions clear, and they are properly notified, you should be fine. Your best bet would be your manager, however.

  • Question

    Do I write my resignation letter on a company letterhead?

    A resignation letter is your personal letter to the company. Thus, a company letterhead is not appropriate..

  • Question

    How do I write a resignation letter due to poor health?

    In your letter, mention that you have poor health and, if you feel comfortable, how your health is an impediment to your continuing on the job.

  • Question

    Is it necessary to give my employer the location and position of my new job?

    No, you don't even have to give them any reason as to why you are leaving. If you have a good relationship with your old boss, you could tell them that you have found another job, but you don't have to give them more information than that.

  • Question

    How do I write a resignation letter in order to tell my boss I am leaving in order to go to school?

    Write something along these lines: "I would like to inform you that I am resigning from my current employment in order to further pursue my educational goals by attending college. I hereby give [X] weeks/months notice of termination according to the requirements of my contract. I have thoroughly enjoyed my time with this company and will miss my role. I thank you for the opportunities that I have had here. Should you have any questions, I will be happy to answer them. Yours sincerely, Thattie Kwondak."

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Tips

  • Be specific about using words such as: Resignation, notice period, last day of work.
  • Do not spread distrust before or after your resignation.
  • Wish them all the best; then keep a small door opened for you in future. It actually helps.
  • Do not ask your supervisor for a reference in your resignation letter. It is proper to ask for a letter of reference, but better to do it after you appraise the reaction of your boss. Try your best to get a letter of reference before you leave, even if you are starting a new job. Once you leave the company, your accomplishments and years of service will be quickly forgotten.
  • Be polite, as this is your last letter to the company, you must remember all your good memories while writing this, not anything negative. Keep negative words aside for having a polite verbal discussion later.
  • Offer your help in transition period.
  • Keep it simple. Try to be short, concise, and direct in your letter. You don't want to leave the letter up for interpretation.
  • Do not discuss your resignation with co-workers; doing so might create negative energy in the office. Do not ask them for advice about writing your resignation letter.

Warnings

  • Remember, the company and its employees could potentially play a role in your career or job search in the future. It is a very small world. Never burn bridges.
  • Do not give specific reasons for leaving. State that you have decided to move because of a career opportunity that is too good to pass up.
  • Check your company termination policy. (Many companies require a minimum of 2 weeks’ notice for resignations.) Otherwise, their policy may be to never consider you again for a position. In your resignation letter, be sure to note the current day somewhere in the header as well as your final day in the body of the letter.
  • Keep in mind that the minute you submit your resignation letter, you could be told to pack your stuff and leave by the end of the day. Do not rely on your two week notice for job hunting: do it before your resignation.
  • Keep emotion out of the letter. Avoid the temptation to tell off your boss or any of your co-workers; put-downs will most certainly reflect poorly on you and you may later regret it.
  • Your letter of resignation is documentation and will likely be added to your personnel file: be very thoughtful about what you place in that document. Do not use slang or foul language.
  • Your letter of resignation could be used against you in court if it ever comes to that.

Resignation Letter Sample Library 1: Two Weeks Notice Templates. The below sample library was designed by our in-house Resume Genius writing team and.

Tips for writing a Standard resignation Letter

sample of resignation letter with notice

What is a Resignation Letter?

Whether you are departing a company on good terms or can’t run fast enough out the door, it may be wise to write a letter of resignation. This type of document formalizes your intention to leave the company and the reasons for your departure. Following these writing tips will smooth out the process of leaving.

Why Should You Write One?

A resignation letter is an efficient way to send the same document to numerous departments keeping all relevant parties well-informed of your departure.

If the document is polite and straightforward, your manager will be impressed with the gesture and thankful for this information. So long as it is constructive, it may even bring intangible benefits to your career down the road, such as potential letters of recommendation, positive appraisals via word of mouth, and may even help you return to the company.

When Should You Write One — Months in Advance or Two Weeks’ Notice?

If you are certain you will be leaving your company, let them know at most two months in advance and at least two weeks. Remember to write out “two weeks’ notice,” not “2 weeks’ notice.”

How Should You Submit Your Letter?

You can have a private meeting with your manager where you share your plans, followed by a formal letter to make it official. In the end, do what you feel comfortable with.

Make sure that your exit is known by all key stakeholders, including your manager and HR. You need to take the initiative to communicate to each department, so don’t assume everyone will be on the same page.

Building a Resignation Letter

We recommend that you write a civil, succinct letter that contains the following:

1. Letter Date

Include the date when you submit the letter on the top left line above the address.

2. Address

The address should follow a formal business letter template. Use the company name on the first line, followed by the street address, city, and ZIP code.

3. Addressee

The addressee is usually your manager — you can use their first name. If the situation calls for it, you can address a larger audience such as unit, team, department, or the whole company.

4. Resignation Declaration

You must make it clear that you are resigning from the first sentence.

5. Date of Departure

A clear departure date is necessary as it lets your manager strategize the path forward.

6. Reasons for Leaving (Optional)

In this section, employ your diplomatic chops and provide a reason for your departure. Acceptable reasons can range from general health concerns, spending more time with family, relocation, career change, and much more.

Keep in mind that this document is usually not the best method to express dissatisfaction with your company. You can metaphorically nail 95 grievances to your boss’s desk by detailing areas of urgent reform but think hard about the pros and cons of delivering such a letter.

7. Thank You Section

Make sure to end the letter by thanking your manager and if you feel grateful, acknowledge the opportunity they gave you.

8. Signature

If you submit a hard copy of the letter, sign above your typed name. A typed name suffices as an online resignation letter.

If you are resigning and a seeking a job, check out our popular resume builder.

Conclusion

A letter of resignation is a functional document that can be used in many exit situations. Usually, the document signifies that your time in the position will come to a close in the coming days. Be prepared for all situations and tailor your letter to match the situation.

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Jun 26, 2018 Use our free resignation letter templates to do just that. to write in a resignation letter and included examples of resignation letters you can use as You can have your notice of resignation ready for when you meet with your.

sample of resignation letter with notice
Written by Yobei
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